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MotoGP 23 Austria Setup: Austrian Grand Prix setup guide - Red Bull Ring guide


The MotoGP Austria round takes place at the stunning Red Bull Ring, but how do you get a good setup for this track? You'll need to be fast in a straight line but also have good steering in the middle and final sectors here.

We're really impressed by MotoGP 23 and went into exactly why in our full review right here. MotoGP 23 is probably the best motorbike game of the year so far, but it's difficult to get on top of.

In MotoGP 23's Single Player Career Mode, the Round 11 of your first full season takes place in Austria. The Austrian GP is the eleventh race on the full calendar, but isn't featured on the short calendar.

Here's our setup guide for Spielberg in MotoGP 23!

MotoGP 23 Austria setup

The Red Bull Ring has enjoyed a revival since being bought by the world-famous drinks manufacturer. Both the Formula 1 Austrian Grand Prix and the Austrian MotoGP have proved to be popular since restarting.

Being located in the Styrian Mountains, Spielberg has a lot of elevation change and blustery wind that will unsettle your bike. The track is a dream to ride around though, as the high-speed corners are exhilarating to round.

MotoGP 23 Austria Setup Tyres
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Starting with the tyres, we think that you should go for Hard rubber on both axles of the bike. This is a big change to previous years, but without the hardest compound available, you'll struggle to make the end of the race.

A Medium tyre on the front would mean that you need to tyre save going into the final laps of the race, so we don't recommend it.

Suspension

MotoGP 23 Austria Setup Suspension
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Front pre-load needs to be low at 1 to allow for more consistent steering through the high-speed corners in Spielberg. Oil quality should slightly higher at 4, with the front spring hardness up at 4.

The front fork compression is best at 4, as is the fork extension.

On the rear, the rear pre-load has to be down at 1 with the Swingarm connector around 4. Spring hardness should be down at 1, with shock absorber compression at 3 and the extension also at 4 to help the bike's overall grip.

Vehicle geometry

MotoGP 23 Austria setup Vehicle Geometry
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For your Vehicle Geometry, the steering head inclination should be up at 1 to allow for more responsive steering.

The trail should be down at 1 but the steering plate needs to be up at 5. Lastly, the rear swingarm length needs to also be up at 5.

Transmission

MotoGP 23 Austria Setup Transmission
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Your gears in Austria should be high to help acceleration out of the fast corners and give a high top speed. This gives a good compromise between acceleration and overall top speed.

The first gear should be lower at four to help acceleration out of the slow corners, but the rest should be at 6. Only the top gear is different at 5 due to the chicane between what used to be Turns 1 and 2.

The slipper clutch should be at 4, though, to help the bike's stability.

Brake System

MotoGP 23 Austria Setup Brakes
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In Austria, there are numerous long braking zones at the end of the pit and back straights. These mean you need powerful brakes and there are more significant braking zones in other areas of the circuit as well.

A 340mm high mass brake on the front and a 220mm on the rear is the only way to go here.

ECU

MotoGP 23 Austria Setup ECU
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As usual, electronic aids that are available to you in MotoGP definitely come in handy here. You'll need to turn all of them up quite high to keep your bike on the road. Traction Control is best at 4, as there are numerous big traction zones.

Engine Braking should be cranked up to 4 in order to shave speed around the long corners. Anti-wheelie should also be at four, thanks to the inclines and declines around the track.

Power mapping is best at 3 for a flying lap, but you'll need to turn this around during some points in the race. This is to save the engine and fuel.

All of these can be adjusted out on track using the HUD in the bottom-right of the screen.

For more articles like this, take a look at our MotoGP page.